Embracing New Mindsets

Organizations everywhere (at least those not lucky enough to be born a Google or an Apple) have been struggling for years to find ways to instill an ethic of innovative thinking into their workforce. In far too many instances, the emphasis has been on improving the effectiveness of their brainstorming activities. Research has shown, however, that the most effective “phase” of the thinking process may lie at the very beginning – in what is called the “framing” stage.

Author John Naisbitt takes it even one step further, and teaches a new method of approaching the framing stage by adopting new mindsets. Think of mindsets as the foundation of the box. In many cases, the foundation is a foot thick and made of solid concrete. The worst part is, if you look down, you’ll find that your feet are embedded in the concrete (no wonder you can’t get out). The answer is to crack up the foundation, so the walls fall down by themselves.

The central part of Naisbitt’s approach lies in his proposition that the thinking process shouldn’t be limited to just one mindset. Instead, he has developed eleven different ways of looking at the world. This should be a breath of fresh air for organizations that have adopted a one-size-fits-all approach to their thinking, and have failed. The idea is to free your thinking, and just let your mind flow.

Development of the Fittest

Who carries the “burden” for executive development and talent retention within an organization? Is it the executive or senior manager who aspires to greater things? Should they be spending their time planning their career path and seeking out new development opportunities? Or is it the employer who must take the lead in this process, through identification, selection, reward and recognition?

The central problem here rests with the fact the traditional mindset that underpins most executive development and talent retention must be changed. The “survival of the fittest” mentality that most organizations have relied upon since the end of WWII to validate who has the “right stuff”, must also be changed.

The new focus and approach has to centre on the overall “development of the fittest”, and that involves a more complicated dual-track approach. Simply put, if your organization fails to adequately provide its high flyers with both applicable work experiences and plentiful training and development opportunities, your top players will more than likely leave.

A core premise, within the new credo, and a very big philosophical change from even 10 years ago, is that an organization should not aim to treat all of its aspiring executives in the same way. In fact, the progressive organization should pro-actively “discriminate” when it comes to their High Potential Officers. Simply put, Talent Management means that the organization needs to find and create unique development solutions and streams for each and every manager with potential. There is no “one size fits all” approach, and generic formulae do not do enough to differentiate between capability, motivation and learning style.

There is another important point to make, and it has to do with the “soft middle” within most organizations. The fact of the matter is, while we may praise the “high potentials”, there is no question the “soft middle” plays a major role in keeping most organizations afloat. They may not have the same upside, or even the same work ethic, dedication or aspirations, but an organization that hopes to win in the market, has to make sure it’s “B Players” are better than the competition’s “B Players”.

In an important way, developing a new, stronger and more robust talent management process has two additional benefits. Aside from rewarding and recognizing your strongest team members – the “high potentials” – you send a strong message that will entice the moderate performers to rise to the occasion. In so doing, you pass ownership of that responsibility to the employees, and improve the overall fitness of the organization.

Become an Influencer

The fact is – modern businesses are constantly burdened by long-term problems. These problems don’t go away. They don’t change. They’re not getting any better.

The problem is – not that we lack the courage to confront these problems, we lack the skill. People tend to act like “copers”, rather than influencers.

The outcome is – we develop complex coping mechanisms and justifications to deal with these problems without creating lasting change. Our business plans do not execute as expected, and we have trouble motivating individuals to follow through with goals.

The solution is – to recognize our ability to influence problems. To be an influencer, we must focus on a small number of “high leverage” behaviours, and apply these to our interactions in order to develop superior performance.

The question here is influence. Why do some organizations seem to resolve their issues, while others remain stagnant? What does it take to influence employees in order to get a solution implemented?

The key is to understand that you, as a leader, have the responsibility to find out what motivates your co-workers and apply that knowledge to get results from them.

There are two kinds of companies in the business world. One kind of company has leaders who are continually meeting new challenges, while the other has leaders who resign to dealing with an ever-shrinking list of challenges “within their control”.

One set of companies is innovating and seeking to deal with its problems. The other is setting up barriers to its own accomplishments.

One organization has influencers, the other has leaders who develop coping mechanisms.

It’s so easy to be the second type of company. That’s the company that labels its challenges as “out of its control” or “impossible to resolve”. It is the company that accepts the status quo. It is the company with a group of leaders who don’t understand influence, and haven’t taken the time to see how they can motivate others to perform.

Dealing with Organizational Silos

All of this talk about paradigm shifts, and out of the box thinking, is starting to wear just a little bit thin. We have all heard it so often, for so many years, in so many different situations, that it has become a seriously depreciated asset whose value has plummeted with each subsequent uttering. The truth is, why are we so worried about getting outside of our box, when many of us can’t even get outside of our department?

Organization after organization – from Canada to Kazakhstan, from Albania to Australia – have become frighteningly compartmentalized, bent inward, shaped into neat little silos, the walls of which seem to have been reinforced with iron will. The risk is simply that the phrase “dismantling silos” holds about as much water today as other jargon words like – solutions, empowerment and transparency. The premise of the argument has been so slowly and so completely worked to death, that the term now lacks any sense of its original urgency or purpose. Call it what you may. Label it how you wish. The problem remains. Silos are still wreaking havoc on organizations day after day. Does anyone care?

We do. So, here are The Beacon Group’s Keys to Breaking Your Silos and Fiefdoms …

Invite the outside in – Why not simply flip things on their head. Rather than build walls – open gates. In every meeting you hold, from now on, invite at least one member from another department to attend.

Go walk about – In the same vein as inviting others to your meetings, go traveling. Invite yourself into “their” meetings. At a minimum, it will show you are interested, and perhaps even incite a reciprocal walk about by them. In addition, get out of the building. Go visiting. Visit suppliers, vendors, even competitors, as often as possible to learn how they conduct their operations, and then bring that knowledge back to your organization.

Demand super-fast technology – Want to break down the walls? Crank up the heat. Things moving too slowly? Turn up the dial. Information taking too long to get to you? Lubricate the channels. You should not only have information flowing to you, but it should be coming quicker and quicker every day. Out fox the fox.

Publish everything – Set the tone by becoming the best darn newspaper or magazine in town. Publish everything. We mean it. Open the valves to full steam. At monthly town hall meetings, devote a portion of your time to “Lessons learned from others”. Make it a priority to learn about new developments and procedures that work for others, and may work for you.

How the Mighty Fall

“I’ve come to see institutional decline like a staged disease: harder to detect but easier to cure in the earlier stages, easier to detect and harder to cure in the later stages.”

Author Jim Collins from his book “How the Mighty Fall: And Why Some Companies Never Give In”

11:40pm, April 14th, 1912, three bells sound.

“Iceberg, straight ahead!”

The First Officer gives the command “hard-a-starboard”, but it’s too late.

The RMS Titanic strikes the iceberg and begins to sink. Hours later countless lives are lost.

How did this happen?

If it had been almost any other boat in existence, this wouldn’t have happened.

This tragedy could have, and should have, been prevented. The Titanic had been dubbed unsinkable, so there weren’t enough lifeboats on board for all of the passengers. In addition, reports of icebergs in the vicinity hours earlier had been ignored. This is the very same sort of arrogance, and denial of common sense, that author Jim Collins says happens every day in business.

Before tragedy hits your organization, you should be on the lookout for the predictable pattern that often traps companies, and ultimately leads to their doom.

The Fact is – if you’re lucky, your company is or has been successful.

The Problem is – in many cases, this success can create a sense of invincibility and false optimism that can ultimately erode the foundation of your company.

The Outcome is – a culture that falsely believes success will continue indefinitely. Ego begins to take over from common sense on key business decisions.

The Solution is – to constantly monitor your organization for signs of overconfidence, and a decline in the rigour with which you made decisions in the past.

Like those at the helm of the Titanic, it’s easy to believe your company is too great to succumb to failure. Collins argues, however, that this sort of mentality is exactly what gets companies into trouble. Perhaps Intel Chairman Andy Grove had it right when he said “only the paranoid survive”.

Remembering that Collins is also the author of “Good to Great”, it is important to note that great organizations were the by-product of humble, company-focused Level 5 Leaders. In the “fallen” companies, Collins found that they lacked any Level 5 Leadership whatsoever.
The Beacon Group’s Key’s to Recovery and Renewal …

Strive for Greatness – If your organization has strayed from its roots, take time to ensure your leaders have the best interests of the company in mind, that you have selected the very best people, and that you focus on the things you can do better than anyone else.
Don’t Read Your Own Press – While success is never a bad thing, don’t let it go to your head. There is always another company out there trying to unseat you. Worse yet, poor decisions and internal laziness can cause your own downfall.

Have Plenty of Lookouts – If you have the right people, at all levels in your company, they will keep their eyes on the horizon, constantly on the lookout for “icebergs” that may harm you. Trust them when they bring items to your attention. The more eyes you have looking for trouble, the less likely you will be to run into it.

Followership

The appetite for books on leadership and management is now so great that many, if not most, have the sexier of the two words, leadership, right in the title – and that’s the problem with leadership today. Leaders in the workplace are always aiming to achieve the benefits, stature and even glamour of being a “real” leader – the person who calls all the shots and creates a visionary plan to boost revenues.

How can you blame them? It’s all they’ve ever read about. It’s all they ever see in the workplace. Perhaps it’s even the behaviour you project as a leader yourself.

Being the stereotypical leader is the easiest way to stand out, the easiest way to be noticed, and the easiest way to move up. Everyone speaks that language.

Who would want to be a follower anyway?

The Fact is leadership, as we know it, is about the individual. It’s about guiding the sheep, if you can put it in those words.

The Problem is that this idea of leadership leaves out the contributions of many others. Worse, it blocks leaders from noticing other leaders.

The Outcome is a company that becomes dependent on the ideas, values and direction of a single person, or group of powerful leaders.

The Solution is to consider the less glamorous role of followers in your organization and assess their condition. Are they detached? Will they question your leadership? Will they follow you in every action you take?

Followership talks about a similar concept. The people you’re leading can play vital roles in organizing smaller projects, smaller groups and smaller ideas. They can mobilize entire components of your vision, or they can be ignored and become isolated and detached. Just because they don’t stand out, doesn’t mean they should be disregarded.

You know exactly who these people are. They are the implementers. Those who sit quietly in meetings, gather all the information, and spring into action when the plan is set.

They are everywhere. You see them every day. But, they don’t scream individualism.

They may not come up with the latest and greatest ideas, but this doesn’t mean they don’t have the power to guide the fortunes of your organization.

Followers are important. Are you paying attention to them?

Archive

Managing Mental Models
GRIT…
the beacon group …
why CEO’s fail
thoughts on thinking
#PrimeDayFail
this idea must die
“I don’t know!”
leading a winning team
Opportunity Sensing
Faint Signals Matter
It’s About Choices
The Coach as Leader
Opening Our Minds
The Human Dynamic
Caution or Courage?
The Evil of Compromise
Karaoke Capitalism
Lies We Tell Ourselves
Shifting Relationships
Mastering Complexity
Breakthrough Strategy
Early Warning Systems
Banishing Dependence
Book Launch Party
Navigating the Future
Disciplined Thinking
No Time to Waste
leading to the future
Mastering Pivot Points